Teen Reads

 

 

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Shout

By Laurie Halse Anderson (Penguin Random House $17.99)

Bestselling author Laurie Halse Anderson is known for the unflinching way she writes about, and advocates for, survivors of sexual assault. Now, inspired by her fans and enraged by how little in our culture has changed since her groundbreaking novel Speak was first published twenty years ago, she has written a poetry memoir that is as vulnerable as it is rallying, as timely as it is timeless. In free verse, Anderson shares reflections, rants, and calls to action woven between deeply personal stories from her life that she’s never written about before. Searing and soul-searching, this important memoir is a denouncement of our society’s failures and a love letter to all the people with the courage to say #MeToo and #TimesUp, whether aloud, online, or only in their own hearts. Shout speaks truth to power in a loud, clear voice– and once you hear it, it is impossible to ignore.

The Year I Didn’t Eat
By Samuel Pollen  (Yellow Jacket $17.99)

Fourteen-year-old Max doesn’t like to eat, and the only one he can confess his true feelings to is Ana—also known as his eating disorder, anorexia. In a journal that his therapist makes him keep, he tells Ana his unfiltered thoughts and fears while also keeping track of his food intake. But Ana’s presence has leapt off the page and into his head, as she feeds upon all of his fears and amplifies them.

When Max’s older brother Robin gives him a geocache box, it becomes a safe place where Max stores his journal, but someone finds it and starts writing to him, signing it with “E.” Is it a joke? Could it be the new girl at school, Evie, who has taken an interest in Max? Although Max is unsure of the secret writer’s identity, he takes comfort in the words that appear in his journal as they continually confide in one another about their problems.

As Max’s eating disorder intensifies, his family unit fractures. His parents and brother are stressed and strained as they attempt to deal with the elephant in the room. When Robin leaves home, Max is left with two parents who are on the verge of splitting up. Max thought he could handle his anorexia, but as time goes on, he feels himself losing any semblance of control.

 

On the Come Up

By Angie Thomas  (Harper Collins $18.99)

Sixteen-year-old Bri wants to be one of the greatest rappers of all time. Or at least win her first battle. As the daughter of an underground hip hop legend who died right before he hit big, Bri’s got massive shoes to fill.
But it’s hard to get your come up when you’re labeled a hoodlum at school, and your fridge at home is empty after your mom loses her job. So Bri pours her anger and frustration into her first song, which goes viral…for all the wrong reasons.
Bri soon finds herself at the center of a controversy, portrayed by the media as more menace than MC. But with an eviction notice staring her family down, Bri doesn’t just want to make it–she has to. Even if it means becoming the very thing the public has made her out to be.

Graphic Greats, Who Changed the World Series (Discovery, Space, Flight and Science)
By Various Authors (B.E.S. Publishing $12.99)

Learn about the innovative heroes who changed the world we live in with their inventions: from Johannes Gutenberg and Thomas Edison to Ada Lovelace, Alan Turing, Katherine Johnson, and more. Graphic Greats series combines the stories of incredible people with graphic illustrations that amplify the meaning of the story and keep kids riveted to each book. Exciting stories and inspiring illustrations of heroic adventurers, innovators, dreamers, and doers make these the kinds of books that kids will return to again and again.

Superpower Science Series (Heroes of Light and Sound, The Superhuman Body, Masters of Matter, and Fantastic Forces and Motion)

By Various Authors (B.E.S. Publishing $8.99)

What if you had a superpower? What would you do if you could fly, read minds, teleport, or have superhuman strength? So what happens if your superpower is shapeshifting or teleporting? Become a master of matter and learn why it truly does matter. Superpower Science answers those questions with humor and a comic book twist as it follows the exploits of superheroes who must come to terms with their very human limitations in the real world. The struggle is real when you have these superpowers in real life and have to apply the laws of science!

 

It Wasn’t Me

Dana Alison Levy (Penguin Random House $16.99)

When Theo’s photography project is mysteriously vandalized at school there are five suspected students who all say “it wasn’t me.”

Theo just wants to forget about the humiliating incident but his favorite teacher is determined to get to the bottom of it and has the six of them come into school over vacation to talk. She calls it “Justice Circle.” The six students–the Nerd, the Princess, the Jock, the Screw Up, the Weirdo, and the Nobody–think of it as detention. AKA their worst nightmare.

That is until they realize they might get along after all, despite their differences. But what is everyone hiding and will school ever be the same?

 

The Journey of Little Charley

By Christopher Paul Curtis (Scholastic $16.99)

Twelve-year-old Charlie is down on his luck: His sharecropper father just died and Cap’n Buck — the most fearsome man in Possum Moan, South Carolina — has come to collect a debt. Fearing for his life, Charlie strikes a deal with Cap’n Buck and agrees to track down some folks accused of stealing from the cap’n and his boss. It’s not too bad of a bargain for Charlie… until he comes face-to-face with the fugitives and discovers their true identities. Torn between his guilty conscience and his survival instinct, Charlie needs to figure out his next move — and soon. It’s only a matter of time before Cap’n Buck catches on.