New Releases

 

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“I cannot live without books” — Thomas Jefferson

 

 

Watching You

By Lisa Jewell (Simon & Schuster $26.00)

Melville Heights is one of the nicest neighborhoods in Bristol, England. It’s the sort of place where doctors and lawyers and old-money academics live. It’s not the sort of place where people get stabbed in the back thirty times with a kitchen knife in their own homes. Someone must have seen something. Newlywed Joey Mullen, for example, recently returned from four years working in Ibiza. She and her husband Alfie are eager to find a place of their own in her hometown. But Joey finds herself distracted by the man next door, Tom Fitzwilliam. He’s the principal of the local high school, twice her age, and devastatingly attractive. What starts as an innocent infatuation soon escalates into fixation, and before long, Joey can’t keep her eyes off of Tom. Or the principal’s son, Freddie, who dreams of working as a spy, and has been developing his surveillance skills by keeping meticulous logs of the coming and goings in the area. And, as he approaches his fifteenth birthday, his attention–and his lens–are turning more and more towards the local women. Or perhaps single mother Frances Tripp, who has long been convinced she is being stalked. Her teenage daughter Jenna is worried these delusions are signs of her mother’s deteriorating mental health, particularly now that her paranoia has found a specific target: Tom Fitzwilliam. Frances is determined to keep an eye on him until she can prove that he is behind her persecution. Twenty years earlier, a schoolgirl writes in her diary, charting her doomed obsession with a handsome young English teacher named Mr. Fitzwilliam. Nobody knows why this horrific murder was committed, but someone in Melville Heights knows who did it. As the community’s fearful eyes turn on each other, the question remains: Who else is watching?

 

Maid

By Stephanie Land (Hachette $27.00)

At 28, Stephanie Land’s plans of breaking free from the roots of her hometown in the Pacific Northwest to chase her dreams of attending a university and becoming a writer, were cut short when a summer fling turned into an unexpected pregnancy. She turned to housekeeping to make ends meet, and with a tenacious grip on her dream to provide her daughter the very best life possible, Stephanie worked days and took classes online to earn a college degree, and began to write relentlessly. She wrote the true stories that weren’t being told: the stories of overworked and underpaid Americans. Of living on food stamps and WIC (Women, Infants, and Children) coupons to eat. Of the government programs that provided her housing, but that doubled as halfway houses. The aloof government employees who called her lucky for receiving assistance while she didn’t feel lucky at all. She wrote to remember the fight, to eventually cut through the deep-rooted stigmas of the working poor.

 

The Orphan of Salt Winds

By Elizabeth Brooks (W.W. Norton & Co.  $15.95)

“England, 1939. Ten-year-old Virginia Wrathmell arrives at Salt Winds, a secluded house on the edge of a marsh, to meet her adoptive parents: practical, dependable Clem and glamorous, mercurial Lorna. The marsh, with its deceptive tides, is a beautiful but threatening place. Virginia’s new parents’ marriage is full of secrets and tensions she doesn’t quite understand, and their wealthy neighbor, Max Deering, drops by too often, taking an unwholesome interest in the family’s affairs. Only Clem offers a true sense of home. War feels far away among the birds and shifting sands, until the day a German fighter plane crashes into the marsh, and Clem ventures out to rescue the airman. What happens next sets into motion a crime so devastating it will haunt Virginia for the rest of her life. Seventy-five years later, she finds herself drawn back to the marsh, and to a teenage girl who appears there, nearly frozen and burdened by her own secrets. In her, Virginia might have a chance at retribution and a way to right a grave mistake she made as a child. Elizabeth Brooks’s gripping debut mirrors its marshy landscape, full of twists and turns and moored in a tangle of family secrets. A gothic, psychological mystery and atmospheric coming-of-age story,

 

Miracle in the Cave: The 12 Lost Boys, Their Coach and the Heroes who Rescued Them

By Liam Cochrane (Harper Collins $17.99)

Featuring never-before-reported details and exclusive interviews with the boys, their families, and rescue workers, the inspiring true story of how twelve members of the Wild Boar Academy Football Club and their coach survived nine days in a labyrinthine cave in Northern Thailand, and of the incredible men and women who pulled off one of the greatest rescues of all time.

For nine days twelve young soccer players and their coach were confined in the dark by rising waters in the caverns of Tham Luang in Chang Rai, Thailand. With no food or drinking water except the condensation found on the cave walls, their survival seemed unlikely. Yet against the odds, a team of determined divers traversed monsoon floodwaters and narrow passageways to find Coach Ek, a stateless orphan devoted to Buddhism, and his young players alive and hopeful.

Liam Cochrane spent more than two weeks on the scene, and was stationed outside of the cave entrance in daily contact with divers and other key members of the rescue team, reporting the story for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. In this mesmerizing and inspiring book, he recounts this ultimate race-against-the-clock event. Filled with never-before-reported details based on exclusive access to the boys, their families, and the rescue team, Miracle in the Cave chronicles the Wild Boars’ ordeal in the cave, and the plan that unfolded outside–including the contentious political negotiations, the early misadventure that halted the operation for crucial hours, and the death of Thai Navy SEAL diver Saman Kunan.

Going deep inside the area between the Thai and Myanmar border, better known for methamphetamines and illegal wildlife trade, Cochrane guides us through every aspect of the adventure-turned-nightmare-turned miracle: the team’s agonizing wait in the darkness; the rescuers’ battle against the forces of nature; the work of international experts who pooled their skills to help. Chochrane evokes the rollercoaster of emotions every step of the way–the terror, optimism, sadness, and joy of this indelible experience.

 

Freefall

By Jessica Barry (Harper Collins $27.99)

When her fiancé’s private plane crashes in the Colorado Rockies, Allison Carpenter miraculously survives. But the fight for her life is just beginning. Allison has been living with a terrible secret, a shocking truth that powerful men will kill to keep buried. If they know she’s alive, they will come for her. She must make it home.

In the small community of Owl Creek, Maine, Maggie Carpenter learns that her only child is presumed dead. But authorities have not recovered her body–giving Maggie a shred of hope. She, too, harbors a shameful secret: she hasn’t communicated with her daughter in two years, since a family tragedy drove Allison away. Maggie doesn’t know anything about her daughter’s life now–not even that she was engaged to wealthy pharmaceutical CEO Ben Gardner, or why she was on a private plane.

As Allison struggles across the treacherous mountain wilderness, Maggie embarks on a desperate search for answers. Immersing herself in Allison’s life, she discovers a sleek socialite hiding dark secrets. What was Allison running from–and can Maggie uncover the truth in time to save her?

Told from the perspectives of a mother and daughter separated by distance but united by an unbreakable bond, Freefall is a riveting debut novel about two tenacious women overcoming unimaginable obstacles to protect themselves and those they love.

 

The Current

By Tim Johnson (Algonquin $27.95)

When two young women leave their college campus in the dead of winter for a 700-mile drive north to Minnesota, they suddenly find themselves fighting for their lives in the icy waters of the Black Root River, just miles from home. One girl’s survival, and the other’s death–murder, actually–stun the citizens of a small Minnesota town, thawing memories of another young woman who lost her life in the same river ten years earlier, and whose killer may yet live among them.

That Churchill Woman

By Stephanie Barron (Penguin Random House $28)

Breathing new life into Jennie’s legacy and the glittering world over which she reigned, That Churchill Woman paints a portrait of the difficult–and sometimes impossible–balance among love, freedom, and obligation, while capturing the spirit of an unforgettable woman, one who altered the course of history.

 

The Widows

By Jess Montgomery (St. Martin Press $26.99 )

Inspired by the true story of Ohio’s first female sheriff, this is a powerful debut about two women’s search for justice as they take on the corruption at the heart of their community.

It’s not long before every guest at Tranquillum House is asking exactly the same question.