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“I cannot live without books”
Thomas Jefferson

NEW RELEASES

This Tender Land
By William Kent Krueger
(Atria Books, $27)

1932, Minnesota–the Lincoln School is a pitiless place where hundreds of Native American children, forcibly separated from their parents, are sent to be educated. It is also home to an orphan named Odie O’Banion, a lively boy whose exploits earn him the superintendent’s wrath. Forced to flee, he and his brother Albert, their best friend Mose, and a brokenhearted little girl named Emmy steal away in a canoe, heading for the mighty Mississippi and a place to call their own.  Over the course of one unforgettable summer, these four orphans will journey into the unknown and cross paths with others who are adrift, from struggling farmers and traveling faith healers to displaced families and lost souls of all kinds. With the feel of a modern classic, This Tender Land is an en-thralling, big-hearted epic that shows how the magnificent American landscape connects us all, haunts our dreams, and makes us whole.

The Long Call
By Ann Cleves
(Minotaur Books $28.99)

In North Devon, where two rivers converge and run into the sea, Detective Matthew Venn stands outside the church as his father’s funeral takes place. Once loved and cherished, the day Matthew left the strict evangelical community he grew up in, he lost his family too. Now, as he turns and walks away again, he receives a call from one of his team. A body has been found on the beach nearby: a man with a tattoo of an albatross on his neck, stabbed to death. The case calls Matthew back into the community he thought he had left behind, as deadly secrets hidden at its heart are revealed, and his past and present collide.

The Secrets We Kept
By Lara Prescott
(Penguin Random House, $28.95)

The Secrets We Kept combines a legendary literary love story–the decades-long affair between Pasternak and his mistress and muse, Olga Ivinskaya, who was sent to the Gulag and inspired Zhivago’s heroine, Lara–with a narrative about two women empowered to lead lives of extraordinary intrigue and risk. From Pasternak’s country estate outside Moscow to the brutalities of the Gulag, from Washington, D.C. to Paris and Milan, The Secrets We Kept captures a watershed moment in the history of literature–told with soaring emotional intensity and captivating historical detail. And at the center of this unforgettable debut is the powerful belief that a piece of art can change the world.

Beekeeper Of Aleppo
By Christy Lefteri
(Penguin Random House $27)

Nuri is a beekeeper and Afra, his wife, is an artist. Mornings, Nuri rises early to hear the call to prayer before driving to his hives in the countryside. On weekends, Afra sells her colorful landscape paintings at the open-air market. They live a simple life, rich in family and friends, in the hills of the beautiful Syrian city of Aleppo–until the unthinkable happens. When all they love is destroyed by war, Nuri knows they have no choice except to leave their home. But escaping Syria will be no easy task: Afra has lost her sight, leaving Nuri to navigate her grief as well as a perilous journey through Turkey and Greece toward an uncertain future in Britain.

Who Are You Calvin Bledsoe?
By Brock Clarke
(Workman Publishers $26.95)

When almost-50-year-old Calvin Bledsoe suddenly finds himself an orphan, an aunt he didn’t know existed appears and coerces him into taking a trip with her to Europe. Complications ensue, and in the course of the journey Calvin finally finds the confidence to be his own man by escaping the powerful hold of first his mother and then his aunt.

Centennial Celebrations
By Denver Junior League
(DJL Publishing $29.99)

The sixth cookbook in JLD’s award-winning collection, Centennial Celebrations includes more than 200 thoughtfully selected and thoroughly tested recipes for every season and occasion – from crowd-pleasing game day appetizers and traditional holiday favorites to light summer fare and winter comfort foods.  

A Republic If You Can Keep It
By Neil Gorsuch
(Penguin Random House $30)

This rich collection offers Gorsuch’s most salient writings and speeches from his over three decades of thinking about the law as a student, practitioner, professor, judge, and now justice. For court watchers and the general public alike, it provides essential insight into his judicial philosophy and his views on the Constitution and the role of judges in this modern republic.

Talking to Strangers
By Malcom Gladwell
(Hachette Book Co. $30 )

How did Fidel Castro fool the CIA for a generation? Why did Neville Chamberlain think he could trust Adolf Hitler? Why are campus sexual assaults on the rise? Do television sitcoms teach us something about the way we relate to each other that isn’t true?
Talking to Strangers is a classically Gladwellian intellectual adventure, a challenging and controversial excursion through history, psychology, and scandals taken straight from the news. He revisits the deceptions of Bernie Madoff, the trial of Amanda Knox, the suicide of Sylvia Plath, the Jerry Sandusky pedophilia scandal at Penn State University, and the death of Sandra Bland—throwing our understanding of these and other stories into doubt. Something is very wrong, Gladwell argues, with the tools and strategies we use to make sense of people we don’t know. And because we don’t know how to talk to strangers, we are inviting conflict and misunderstanding in ways that have a profound effect on our lives and our world.